World Health Summit Regional Meeting - North America, Montreal 2017

Health and Healthcare Delivery in Pluralistic Societies 

Date: May 8-9, 2017
Venue: Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
Hosts: Université de Montréal + Institut de recherches Cliniques de Montréal

The Université de Montréal and the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) are proud to announce that they will be hosting the 1st World Health Summit (WHS) of the M8 Alliance to be held in North America. The world leaders in global health will be attending this prestigious event, including over 800 researchers, doctors, industry leaders, decision-makers, government members and civil society actors from around the world.

Based on the theme of “Health and Healthcare Delivery in Pluralistic Societies,” this interdisciplinary event will focus on the question of human diversity in the practice, education, research and public policy pertaining to health.

In pluralistic societies that welcome diversity, such as ours, many factors will impact health and the provision of healthcare, including globalization, immigration, social and economic inequalities, lifestyle, and culture. We believe that it is our mission, as scholars, to turn our attention to this important phenomenon and to analyze it in depth.

This event is one of the most important of its kind in Canada. It is with the utmost enthusiasm that we invite you to attend.

In order to explore the different aspects of the central theme, the conference will be divided into four subtopics:

New Frontiers in Medical Treatment
Development of precision medicine, rare and genetic diseases, viral infections, diabetes, and antibiotic resistance.

Health and Healthcare Delivery for Specific Groups
First Nations health, health and immigration, health in the workplace, healthcare quality and patient safety.

Environmental, Social and Cultural Determinants of Health
Transformation of the urban environment and its impact on the health of city dwellers, the promotion of healthy lifestyle habits and its influence on healthcare costs.

Medical Education for Optimal Healthcare
Medical education and the evolution of the physicians’ role in society, the global health curriculum and the accreditation of medical schools.


Welcome Message

As the president of the 2017 World Health Summit, I am pleased to welcome you to Montreal as it celebrates its 375th anniversary.

The Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal will host the first regional WHS meeting in North America, in partnership with the École de santé publique of the Université de Montréal and the Montreal Clinical Research Institute.

As one of the most prestigious institutions in research and health education in Canada, the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal is proud to belong to the M8 Alliance, a vast network of leaders in global health that promotes collaboration and research in fields of study that will have a crucial impact on humanity's future.

We aim to train healthcare personnel and to expand the horizons of knowledge in order to improve the health and quality of life of our fellow citizens so that they may lead healthy lives and attain their fullest potential. With this goal in mind, we have thrown ourselves into the organization of this great international annual assembly on health, since we know that we need to work together in order to succeed.

The subject of the 2017 Montreal gathering, "Health and Healthcare Delivery in Pluralistic Societies," will give us the opportunity to create a forum for interdisciplinary discussion and to emphasize human diversity in the practice, education, research and public policy pertaining to healthcare.

This event is a tremendous scientific and political platform for the discussion of current issues such as immigrant and First Nations health, the appearance of new treatment-resistant viruses, the quality of life and safety of patients, health in large urban environments and the evolution of healthcare and medical education.

Happy Montreal Summit!

Hélène Boisjoly
President of the WHS
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
Université de Montréal
Canada


Program

The program will be structured by four main themes:

New Frontiers in Medical Treatment
Development of precision medicine, rare and genetic diseases, viral infections, diabetes, and antibiotic resistance.

Health and Healthcare Delivery for Specific Groups
First Nations health, health and immigration, health in the workplace, healthcare quality and patient safety.

Environmental, Social and Cultural Determinants of Health
Transformation of the urban environment and its impact on the health of city dwellers, the promotion of healthy lifestyle habits and its influence on healthcare costs.

Medical Education for Optimal Healthcare
Medical education and the evolution of the physicians’ role in society, the global health curriculum and the accreditation of medical schools.

Please note that all presentations will be given in English. Simultaneous translation will be offered for keynote presentations.

Program overview

Detailed program

All information on speakers, topics and presentations is available in our interactive program planner

 


Speakers

The  World Health Summit Regional Meeting brings together leading researchers, physicians, government officials and representatives from industry, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and healthcare systems worldwide.

Among the confirmed speakers are:
(in alphabetical order)

Government Keynote Speakers

Keynote Speaker


Hosts

University of Montreal

University of Montreal and its two affiliated schools, École Polytechnique (engineering) and HEC Montréal (business) are amongst the world's top 100 universities, according to international rankings. Founded in 1878, the campus today has over 66,000 students and 2,600 professors, making University of Montreal the second largest university in Canada. Its students are drawn to the university by its deep roots in cosmopolitan Montreal and in consideration of its tenacious dedication to its international mission.

The Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal has a threefold mission: the teaching, research, and improvement of healthcare in the fundamental sciences, clinical sciences, and health sciences sectors. Boasting  sixteen departments and two schools, it trains one third of doctors in Quebec, as well as a significant number of the health professionals in the province.

With its widespread hospital network, numerous affiliated institutes and the important responsibilities it has been given by the government of Quebec, the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal plays a prominent role in Canadian society.

The School of Public Health of the University of Montreal (ESPUM) is the only institution of its kind in Quebec and a leader in Canada and in the francophone world. It strives to be a locus of excellence and critical reflection in the teaching, research and promotion of knowledge pertaining to the public health fields. Fuelled by scientific innovation and excellence, the ESPUM offers widely recognized high-level graduate study programs.

Montreal Clinical Research Institute

Founded in 1967, the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) is a non-profit organization that conducts fundamental and clinical biomedical research in addition to training high-level young scientists. With its cutting-edge technology facilities, the institute brings together 33 research teams, which work in cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, systems biology and medicinal chemistry. The IRCM also operates a research clinic specialized in hypertension, cholesterol, diabetes and cystic fibrosis, as well as a research centre on rare and genetic diseases in adults. The IRCM is affiliated with the University of Montreal and associated with McGill University. Its clinic is affiliated with the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM). The IRCM is supported by the Ministère de l’Économie, de la Science et de l’Innovation (Quebec ministry of Economy, Science and Innovation).


Plan your stay

Montreal: a city whose passion, joie de vivre and rich cultural heritage are legendary

Marked by its past, proud of its bicultural heritage, and further enriched by immigration, Montréal turns resolutely toward the future.

Today, Montréal is home to some 3.4 million inhabitants who represent no fewer than 80 different ethnic groups. Montréal lives up to its reputation as an international city.

The second-largest French-speaking city in the world, Montréal hosted one of the most impressive world fairs of the century in 1967 as well as the 1976 Summer Olympic Games. The city donned its finest to welcome visitors and has preserved and even improved several of the attractions that it built for the two occasions. Because Montréal always loves to celebrate, it has naturally become a city of dazzling international festivals (jazz, film, comedy, fireworks, fine dining, Winter sports and so forth). The rhythm of events intensifies and visitors and Montrealers alike join in the dance. More than a few succumb to the city’s mixture of European and North American charm that both surprises and enchants.

Dynamic and modern, but respectful of its architectural heritage, Montréal successfully blends the old with the new. A trip through the past in Old Montréal and the Old Port lets you witness the origins and the growth of the colony. Museums and historical sites alternate with irresistible bistros in an atmosphere of yesteryear.

While venerating its past, Montréal also looks to the future, having earned a reputation as a world leader in leading-edge technologies such as aeronautics, information technologies and biotechnologies. Montréal is also an innovator, whether in the field of medical technology and equipment, the arts (for example, the Cirque du Soleil, modern dance and experimental theatre), information technology (software and multimedia productions) or in urban development (a unique underground city).

For those who wish to take a closer reading of Montréal’s pulse, what could be better than a stopover in some of the city’s most picturesque districts, such as the Jean-Talon Market in Little Italy, or along Saint-Denis Street in the Plateau Mont-Royal. In neighbourhood markets, boutiques, restaurants and cafés radiates the soul of Montréal, and the vitality and joie de vivre of its inhabitants.

Happy birthday Montreal

On the occasion of Montréal’s 375th anniversary celebrations, let’s celebrate Montréal’s vivacity. If the downtown core and historic Old Montréal shine year-round with international festivals and events, summer 2017 will certainly be even more special. It’s time to celebrate Montréal’s roots: its history and heritage, not to mention its identity and diversity, in high style! Festivals, tastings, church bell concerts and neighourhood tours... The list is long!

Do not hesitate to take part in Montreal's 375th anniversary

Fun facts

  • John Lennon and Yoko Ono held their legendary Bed-In in Montréal at the Fairmont the Queen Elizabeth hotel from May 26 to June 2, 1969.
  • A popular local snack is “poutine” (French fries with cheese curds topped with gravy) – absolutely delicious!
  • Our “underground city” has over 30 km (18 miles) of pedestrian walkways, indoor areas and tunnels linking 8 subway stations, 5 train stations and termini, 63 buildings, 9 major hotels, 2,000 businesses, 1,700 boutiques, 37 cinemas, theatres and exhibition halls, 10 university buildings and 43 indoor parking areas.
  • The legal drinking age in Montréal is 18. Bars and restaurants can serve beer and alcohol from 11 a.m. to 3 in the morning.
  • What others call “pastrami”, we call “smoked meat”. (By the way, our smoked meat sandwiches are to die for!)
  • An entrée here is actually an appetizer.
  • Montréal is among the 10 best cities in the world for outdoor dining, according to American travel guide publisher, Frommers.
  • In total, 80 languages are spoken in the Montréal region, including French, English, Italian, Spanish, Arabic, Greek, Chinese, German, Portuguese, Creole and Vietnamese.
  • Montréal ranks second to Halifax for the number of Titanic victims buried in its cemeteries (12 in all).
  • Eye contact in Montréal differs from that in other major cities. Whereas discretion is the order of the day elsewhere, Montréalers do not shy away from making eye contact with strangers.
  • With the highest number of tango dancers and dance halls on the continent, Montréal is the tango capital of North America.
  • Greeting a French-speaking person from Montréal can be confusing for visitors. The customary way to greet friends in Montréal is to kiss them on both cheeks, starting with the right, whereas Canadians in other provinces tend to keep their distance and simply shake hands.

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