Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

A platform that brings together international participants from a wide range of sectors, the World Health Summit is a much more than just a highlight in the calendar of international events aimed at healthcare professionals. Its close cooperation with leading universities, research facilities and national academies also makes it a unique opportunity for anyone concerned with human health – from the local to the global level.

The following set of FAQs is designed to answer basic enquiries about the World Health Summit and its organization. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you feel your question is not addressed. (contact).

What is the World Health Summit?

Where does the World Health Summit take place?

What are the goals of the World Health Summit?

When was the World Health Summit founded?

Who organizes the World Health Summit?

What are the WHS Regional Meetings?

What is the M8 Alliance?

Who finances the World Health Summit?

Who attends the World Health Summit?

The tickets for the World Health Summit seem to be quite expensive…

How can I contribute to the World Health Summit’s program?

How can I get in touch with other World Health Summit participants?

How and where can I register?

Is the World Health Summit accredited as training course for physicians?

What have the main topics of the World Health Summit been in the past?

What is the World Health Summit?

Held in Berlin each October, the World Health Summit brings together thought leaders and visionaries from academia, the healthcare industry and governmental and civil society agencies to set the agenda for the future state of global health.

Underpinned by the M8 Alliance of Academic Health Centres, Universities and National Academies, the World Health Summit is organized in collaboration with the national academies of sciences in 97 countries. The inaugural event took place in 2009 on the occasion of the 300-year anniversary of founding of the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. (More information)

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Venue of the World Health Summit

Where does the World Health Summit take place?

From 2009-2012, the World Health Summit was held at the Langenbeck-Virchow-Haus in Berlin. In 2013, the venue moved within the German capital to the German Federal Foreign Office building. Due to renovations of the conference area the World Health Summit changed the Berlin venue in 2017 to Kosmos

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Goals of the WHS

What are the goals of the World Health Summit?

The primary goals of the World Health Summit are 1) to strengthen the link between research, academic medicine and decision-makers throughout every branch of healthcare and related sectors, 2) to build and strengthen a worldwide network for health and research, and 3) to provide academic expertise for the global health agenda. The WHS provides a forum to facilitate these goals and address the issues that demand a unified approach.

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When was the WHS founded

When was the World Health Summit founded?

In a highly successful roll-out, the WHS was inaugurated in 2009 on the occasion of the 300-year anniversary of the founding of the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. It is now held annually.

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Organizers

Who organizes the World Health Summit?

The World Health Summit is organized by the WHS Foundation GmbH, which keeps an Organizing, Executive and Media Office located at the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. The event is supported and advised by the M8 Alliance of Academic Health Centers, Universities and National Academies.

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What are the Regional Meetings

What are the WHS Regional Meetings?

The WHS Regional Meetings have been held in:

  • Singapore, 2013
  • São Paulo, 2014
  • Kyoto, 2015).
  • Geneva 2016

The next WHS Regional Meeting will be in Montral from May 8-9

Much like the annual World Health Summit in Berlin, these meetings are a chance for representatives from academia, politics, civil society, and the private sector to meet and consult on their continent’s most pressing health issues. The themes and topics in the spotlight at Regional Meetings focus on regional challenges and approaches.

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Definition M8 Alliance

What is the M8 Alliance?

The "M8 Alliance of Academic Health Centers, Universities and National Academies" is a collaboration between top international academic institutions aimed at using academic excellence to improve global health. In tandem with political and economic decision-makers, the M8 Alliance develops science-based solutions for health challenges worldwide.

Here, you can find detailed a definition of the M8 Alliance and a list of its members

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Financing

Who finances the World Health Summit?

The World Health Summit is organized as a non-profit project, and relies for financing on contributions and sponsorship from various stakeholders. Governmental support contributes about 40% of the project’s budget, while the private sector brings in about 35% of its funding. 25% of the budget is raised from academic and research institutions (Partner Institutions).

Partner symposia are mainly financed by various supporting institutions. Not a single WHS speaker receives a fee for appearing at the World Health Summit, and more than half of the speakers cover their own expenses for travel and accommodation.

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Who attends

Who attends the World Health Summit?

The World Health Summit addresses leaders and decision-makers from academia (ca. 45% of the attendants), politics (ca. 12%), the private sector (ca. 19%), civil society (ca. 17%) and media (ca. 7%). The gender balance is 52% male and 48% female. (All numbers refer to the World Health Summit 2016)

The World Health Summit is designed and held as an open and democratic forum. It welcomes anyone interested in matters involving global health concerns to join its discussion and exchange.

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Ticket prizes

The tickets for the World Health Summit seem to be quite expensive…

As a non-profit project, the World Health Summit invests all revenue from attendance in adjusting its program to meet participant demands and paying travel/accommodation costs for top-notch speakers at the event. The money brought in by ticket sales also strengthens the intellectual independence of the forum.

Because various discounts are offered for students, participants from Non-OECD countries and NPOs, anyone interested in attending the World Health Summit can be enabled to participate.

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Participation

How can I contribute to the World Health Summit’s Program?

As an open and democratic forum, the World Health Summit always welcomes suggestions regarding its program, topics or speakers. The earlier these are communicated, the better the chances for implementation. Contact

There is a wide range of opportunities open to those who want to play an active role in the event, including getting involved in interactive workshops, networking events and the "WHS Community" (formerly: “Book of Participants”), which offers all contributing participants access to other participant contact data.

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Getting in touch

How can I get in touch with other World Health Summit participants?

As a registered user, you can easily get in contact with other WHS participants via the WHS Community. Due to data privacy protection laws, contact information is only available to those who contribute their own data and accept the privacy regulations.

Additionally, the World Health Summit offers various opportunities for professional networking or more leisurely exchange during breaks, discussions, and evening events.

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Tickets

How and where can I register?

Located in the navigation sector called "WHS 2017", the registration area on the homepage will guide you through the easy registration process, and provide you with information on all prizes, discounts and “Early Bird” offerings. Tickets for the World Health Summit will be available starting in spring of each year.

Tickets for the WHS Regional Meetings are available in the "REGIONAL MEETING" section

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Training course

Is the World Health Summit accredited as training course for physicians?

Since 2016, participating in the World Health Summit is being certified with 6 points per day by the Berlin Chamber of Physicians

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Topics so far

What have the main topics at the World Health Summit been in the past?

2016 - World Health Summit
Topics:
Migration and Refugee Health: From Care to Policy
Technological Innovation for Health: Improving Healthcare Delivery
Women, Empowerment and Health: Equality and Agency
Infectious Diseases: Lessons Learned from Ebola to Zika
Translational Research: Advancing Innovative Treatment
Sustainable Development Goals: Transforming the Health Agenda
Precision Medicine and Oncology

2015 - World Health Summit
Topics:
Antimicrobial Resistance: A Threat to Health Security
Positioning Health in the Post-2015 Development Agenda
Climate Change and Health
Ebola: Preparedness and Response
The Digital Health Revolution
Medical Education
Refugee Health & Mega Disasters

2016 - WHS Geneva Meeting
Theme:
“Global Health: Sustainable and Affordable Innovation in Healthcare”

2015 - WHS Regional Meeting - Asia, Kyoto
Topics:
Challenges in a Rapidly Aging Society
Preparedness for & Resilience after Disasters
Fostering New Leadership

2014 - World Health Summit
Topics:
Climate Change and Health
Healthy Aging, Healthy Cities & Prevention
Universal Health Coverage
Medical Education

2014 - WHS Regional Meeting – Latin Amercia, São Paulo
Topics:
Healthy Life Expectancy
Urban Health / Health in Megacities
Increased Research Capacity to Incorporate Technologies
Management of Health Systems to Ensure Universal Coverage
Health Education

2013 - World Health Summit
Topics:
Research and Innovation
Education and Leadership
Evidence to Policy
Global Health for Development

2013 - WHS Regional Meeting - Asia, Singapore
Topics:

The Impact of Health on Asian Economies
Innovations in Health in Asia
Financing Health Care in Asia
Emerging Health Threats in Asia

2012 - Research for Health and Sustainable Development
Topics:
Diseases of Modern Environments
Translating Research into Policy
Health and Economy
Educating Health Professionals
Information Technology for Health

2011 - Today's Science - Tomorrow's Agenda
Topics:
Today’s Science
Research and Innovation
Strengthening Health Systems
Tomorrow’s Agenda

2010 - Translation – Transition –Transformation
Topics:
Delivering Innovation Beyond Bench and Bedside
Coping With New Health Challenges and Accelerating Change
Reinventing Health Politics and Management

2009 - The Evolution of Medicine
Topics:
Infectious Diseases
Health Care Across the Generations
Health Systems
Adapting the Research Agenda

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